Storing Image Data in Block RAM on a Xilinx FPGA

Now that we have a VGA synchronization circuit we can move on to designing a pixel generation circuit that specifies unique RGB data for certain pixels (i.e. an image). Before we actually go there, I thought I would separately talk a little bit about how to store image data on an FPGA. This discussion will focus mainly with using a Xilinx FPGA, more specifically the Basys 3, which uses 12-bit color.

Raw images are arrays of pixel data. Each pixel has a number of bits that specifies the intensity of the red, green, and blue color components. Assuming that an image is stored in 24-bit “True Color”, there are 8 bits specifying each respective color component. Since we are using the Basys 3 FPGA, we will need only the upper four bits of each color component (3 colors * 4 bits/color = 12 bits). So we need 12 bits per pixel to represent color, and y*x pixels, where y is the image height, and y is the image width.

The image of Yoshi shown above is scaled up such that we can easily see each pixel as a block of color on our screen. This image has a height of 32 pixels, and a width of25 pixels. That means that in total we have 800 pixels, each needing 12 bits to represent color, so 9600 bits altogether. There are a few ways to store all of these bits.

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FIFO Buffer Using Block RAM on a Xilinx Spartan 3 FPGA

A FIFO (first in first out) buffer allows for temporary storage for transmission of data between subsystems. It is a very common construct used in digital systems, but why do we need them?

As an example, let’s say that we have a keyboard subsystem that, when a key is pressed, sends corresponding ASCII data to a UART subsystem, which then serially passes the data on to a receiving PC. Assuming that data is directly relayed between the keyboard and UART subsystems, there is risk of data corruption if another key is pressed before the last  key’s ASCII data has been processed by the UART subsystem. This condition is known as data overrun, and can be avoided by inserting a data buffer such as a FIFO between the keyboard and UART subsystems. If the baud rate for a UART is high enough, then the likelihood of data overrun occurring is limited by how fast a user can mash the keyboard’s keys (which for the previous implementation was unlikely). Regardless, it is a good idea to provide data buffers between subsystems that are not instantaneous in their processing of sent and received data.

In this post I will briefly detail how to implement a FIFO buffer in Verilog HDL using the Block RAM on a Xilinx Spartan 3 FPGA. The implementation will allow us to specify the number of words (pieces of data) in the FIFO as well as word width (number of bits per word). We will be able to read from and write to the FIFO, assuming it isn’t in an empty or full state, which we will keep track of and signal out from the FIFO to make the utilizing subsystem aware.

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